Kelley business students learn 3D printing potential

The potential is practically limitless.

3D printing has the potential to revolutionize modern manufacturing.

“One of the hottest trends in modern manufacturing is 3D printing because of its implications to change supply chains,” said Mark Frohlich, associate professor of operations management at the Kelley School of Business Indianapolis. “You can see the creativity it opens up. It brings the customer more into the supply chain.”

3D printing is still relatively new to business school courses.

Frohlich decided to add 3D printing to a logistics management course he teaches to Evening MBA students.

“3D printing can really truncate supply chain. Before 3D printing, a consumer would have to purchase a dust pan from a retailer. Someday - he or she could actually create the dust pan instead of going to the store,” Frohlich explained.

Photo taken by student of a 3D printer.
Mark Frohlich, associate professor of operations management, speaks to students in an Evening MBA class.
One group of students created the IUPUI jaguars using a 3D printer.
Another group of Evening MBA students created a large mug using a 3D printer.
Another group of Evening MBA students created a stand for a phone with a 3D printer.
Students presented their 3D printing pieces on a screen for the entire class to see.
An Evening MBA student presents to the class after completing a 3D printing project.
Speaking of useful, one group of Evening MBA students creates a snow scraper with a 3D printer.
Another Evening MBA student group created a gear that turned with a 3D printer.
A student group creates pieces to a wheelchair, that could be used as replacement parts when one breaks.